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Benito Is Your Friend

In case you missed it, here’s Whole Foods Market CEO John Mackey apologizing for calling Obamacare “fascist”.

Now, you know, I know, and Mackey knows that the term is precisely accurate. Obama’s co-opting of private enterprise and the regulatory capture of the health care industry are, quite exactly, the preferred tactics of statists o…

  1. WI Con

    I don’t have a problem with the facist label. When they howl about it though. its more fun to educate them about how uninformed and uneducated they are in history. Ask them if they’re OK with Italian style fascism but not German style? Why? Aside from the Jews, is the Italian for OK?

    As you stated in that first post, its about control vs. ownwership.

  2. Severely Ltd.

    WI Con is right, sometimes it’s good to hear them howl, but it’s nice to have a backup when it’s a nice, well-meaning Liberal.

    Liberal Fascism was a bigger rock than the Left realized when Jonah first heaved it in the pond. The ripples are still coming long after they thought they’d discredited it. I remember a discussion on the writer John Scalci’s website where it was determined that Naziism wasn’t really leftist because the state didn’t own the means of production. The consensus seemed to be; therefore it’s really not fair to lump the Nazi’s in with the Communists. The subtext was; gotcha on a technicality, stupid Wingnuts.

    But the book got everyone talking about the horrors of both systems and in the heat of argument the Left made admissions you could never wring out of them if they weren’t in such a panic to avoid the Fascist label.

    Jonah is every bit as valuable as Breitbart was–in a different way of course–and we’re lucky to have him involved with Ricochet.

  3. Doug Kimball

    Or maybe we could refer to it as Il Duce Health Care.  Il Duce was the nickname given to Mussolini when he took control of Italy with his new form of national socialism (workers of Italy unite - as opposed to the world.)   His central planning, crony capitalism model was the envy of progressives around the world, including Wilson and FDR.  Wilson introduced these statist ideas in his cabinet and used the war as justification for the power grab.  FDR pushed things into the social sphere – with the depression and later WWII as cover.  At first Il Duce (eel DOO-chay, means The Leader in Italian) was an endearing term, but it became pejorative as Il Duce became more tyrannical and joined with Hitler and Hiroshito.  I think it fits our current POTUS equally well, perhaps Il Duche II – that looks kind of cool on paper, doesn’t it?  This will absolutely drive the Libs nuts.

  4. Percival

    I am much interested and deeply impressed by what he has accomplished and by his evidenced honest purpose of restoring Italy and seeking to prevent general European trouble.

    – Franklin Delano Roosevelt, on Benito Mussolini

    If their lord and master FDR was impressed, then where oh where can the problem be?  And have you ever noticed how often Barry likes to pose with his chin stuck out?

    Brilliant, Fredö!

    If they still object, and start losing it, be sure to toss in the phrase “what difference does it make?”

  5. Fredösphere

    I think all your points work when the topic of the conversation is fascism. When a conservative is introducing “fascist” as an adjective in a discussion not about fascism, it’s a loser. Mackey, in the context given him, simply had no time to go on a tangent and recite long sections from Liberal Fascism.

    My way attacks popular assumptions about fascism while also winning debating points in the short term. Win-win.

  6. Frank Soto
    C

    I’m reminded of a Mark Steyn line from a while back.

    “Say what you will about the Obama administration, but it made the naming of train stations run on time.”

  7. flownover

    Evidently too few people read Jonah’s book. Or too many.

    Mackey pegged it, and he ignored his position as a high priest of the arugula cult . This brought down the reproach of the language bending Alinskyite Orwellian shock troops .

    “What ! Our shirts aren’t brown !

    They’re taupe you redneck hater .”

  8. DrewInWisconsin

    What is it with these people who tell the truth about Obama, and then back off like beaten curs? Mackey, Mickelson, “Papa John,” . . . it’s almost like horse heads appear in their beds, and then they come out and give public mea culpas for speaking up.

    Any public figures out there who are willing to stand up and take whatever flack the stupid lefties throw at them for insulting The One?

  9. The Mugwump

    Yeah, this from the same crowd that cheered “peace in our time” without a trace of irony.  The memory hole has become big enough to swallow a zeppelin.  What’s next?  “Land!  Peace!  Bread!”   

  10. Leigh
    Severely Ltd.:

    Jonah is every bit as valuable as Breitbart was–in a different way of course–and we’re lucky to have him involved with Ricochet. · 1 hour ago

    His last article, on gun control and Joe Biden, was a masterpiece — along the lines of the type of effective argument Fredösphere is describing.  He makes you think rather than making emotional barriers go up before getting to the meat of the argument.

  11. I. raptus

    It’s really foolish to use heated rhetoric like this.  Historically, fascism (whether Italian or German) involves a great deal more than simple corporatism.  Since what he actually means is corporatism, not some deeper connection with German or Italian fascism, then just say that.  There’s no need to use scare words.  Use the correct words.

    Any comparison to fascism in politics is way too heated to use in any serious political rhetoric and will quickly shut it down.  Even if the reference is technically accurate in some limited ways, if you have to back it up with a reference to a chapter of a politically-charged book, come on, use common sense.  No one’s going to be impressed by that.  And, quite frankly, anyone who is serious about political discussion should know that.

    Not to mention the CEO of a publicly traded company.  I have no sympathy for this guy; it was an extremely dumb thing for Mackey to say.

  12. Misthiocracy

    I prefer to use “orwellian” as an all-around label for authoritarian government initiatives.

    I fear that “Mussolini” is too closely connected to Hitler in the popular consciousness for his name to be used as a viable alternative for “fascist”.

    “Orwellian” is the only adjective I’m aware of that is generally non-offensive to those on the left as well as on the right, and can be applied to socialist, communist, and fascist initiatives.

  13. Douglas

    Jonah Goldberg was right. Liberals are Fascists, though a “lite” variety. Still Fascists though.

  14. Blame The Innocent

    Sorry Fredö, I read Jonah’s book as well and Mackey was using the term correctly.  Mackey doesn’t deserve any slack now for apologizing for using the word correctly.  Unless he had been drinking:  “Whiskey don’t make liars, it just makes fools…I didn’t mean to say it, but I meant what I said.”  – James McMurtry

  15. Misthiocracy
    DrewInWisconsin: What is it with these people who tell the truth about Obama, and then back off like beaten curs? Mackey, Mickelson, “Papa John,” . . . it’s almost like horse heads appear in their beds, and then they come out and give public mea culpas for speaking up.

    “It” is that these particular people happen to depend to a large degree on public opinion for their livelihood. Mackey and “Papa John” depend on consumers who are apt to change they buying habits according to their politics, and Mickelson depends on sponsors who depend on consumers who are apt to change their buying habits according to their politics.

    We all have freedom of speech. We do not have freedom from consequence.

  16. Misthiocracy
    Blame The Innocent: Sorry Fredö, I read Jonah’s book as well and Mackey was using the term correctly. 

    Communications is not only about speaking accurately. It’s also about speaking persuasively. If one speaks the truth but fails to persuade, can one be said to have communicated successfully?

  17. Tommy De Seno
    C

    I had this problem writing for Fox News.   They constantly edited the word “fascist” out of my columns about Obama when I was referring to the Corporatist model of making public/private cartels.  

    They didn’t edit Glen Beck, which really aggravated me.

    I had this very conversation with Fred Smith of the Conservative Enterprise Institute.  He was using the word socialism regarding the President’s policies.  I asked him if the polices were actually more fascist/corporatist, particularly since he was socializing ownership without socializing profits.

    Fred agreed, but said Fascism is such a charged word that the discussion would go off track if we used it.

    I disagree.  Call it what it is.  How can we fight against something if we mis-identify it?  How do we teach young people its perils if we ignore what it truly is?

  18. Leigh
    Misthiocracy

    Blame The Innocent: Sorry Fredö, I read Jonah’s book as well and Mackey was using the term correctly. 

    Communications is not only about speaking accurately. It’s also about speaking persuasively. If one speaks the truth but fails to persuade, can one be said to have communicated successfully? · 3 minutes ago

    Before speaking, one should ask not only “Is it true?” but “Is it profitable?”

    And if a word choice will raise emotional barriers to the degree that one’s argument is not heard, it’s probably not profitable.

  19. Misthiocracy
    Leigh

    Misthiocracy

    Blame The Innocent: Sorry Fredö, I read Jonah’s book as well and Mackey was using the term correctly. 

    Communications is not only about speaking accurately. It’s also about speaking persuasively. If one speaks the truth but fails to persuade, can one be said to have communicated successfully? · 3 minutes ago

    Before speaking, one should ask not only “Is it true?” but “Is it profitable?”

    I did not use the word “profitable”.  I used the word “persuasive”.  I do not believe those words are synonyms.  (Not that you were suggesting that I did.)

    Leigh

    And if a word choice will raise emotional barriers to the degree that one’s argument is not heard, it’s probably not profitable. ·

    I would have no quarrel with the statement: If a word choice will raise emotional barriers to the degree that one’s argument is not heard, it’s probably not persuasive. 

  20. Kervinlee

    Well, maybe Mackey has regrets about saying it but I don’t: the Obama administration is fascist.

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