Audible Recommendations For Guy With Two Credits Burning a Hole in His Pocket

I’ve got two audible credits, and can’t find something appealing (and am still perplexed by the fact that neither Cather’s Death Comes for the Archbishop nor Grossman’s Life and Fate have ever been recorded).

I just got Atkinson’s Guns of Last Light (which is as good as I had hoped) and will get Dean Koontz’s new Odd Thomas book next week (already pre-ordered and pre-paid). BTW, Koontz doesn’t always float my boat, but this series is wonderful and the actor who r…

  1. Illiniguy

    Having just completed a driving trip through Mississippi and Tennessee, I downloaded and listened to “The Reivers” by William Faulkner. It was narrated by John Mayer. It was a delightful story, well read, and re-introduced me to a great American writer.

  2. Basil Fawlty

    Penance for Jerry Kennedy by George V. Higgins.  All dialogue, made for Audible listening.

  3. Louie Mungaray (Squishy Blue RINO)

    I recommend the Nostalgia Radio section. I  found The Thin Man and After the Thin Man, with William Powell and Myrna Loy in the Movies on the Radio section. Only a dollar or two each, no need to burn a credit.

    I searched Patrick Tull/Classics and found Patrick Tull reading Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Books II. The story Red Dog alone is worth a credit, but come on, Tull reading Kipling? That’s strong like a bull.

  4. Cesar

    The Dune audiobook was great.

  5. Little My

    Actually, a radio play version of Life and Fate is available at Audible. It was AWFUL — imagine trying to indicate that a character is a low-level Russian soldier by giving him a Cockney (!!!) accent. Also, it must have been difficult to condense that sweeping story.

    I did enjoy The Guns of August, but it is quite long and includes so much detail that I kept losing the thread of it if I couldn’t listen every day.

    I, too, would love to have a good audio recording of Death Comes for the Archbishop. And I just finished listening for the third time to Patrick Tull’s reading of Master and Commander. I was acquainted with the late Patrick Tull when I was part of the Patrick O’Brian discussion group. He always had witty and erudite comments, and pointed out that as a professional reader, he had to always be practicing in order to keep his voice at peak performance. I believe he was an actor by profession. Unfortunately, Audible only has the first volume of the series as read by Patrick Tull, probably for copyright reasons.

  6. Salvatore Padula

    I, Claudius.

  7. Flagg Taylor

    How about an Alan Furst novel?

  8. Illiniguy
    Flagg Taylor: How about an Alan Furst novel? · 0 minutes ago

    I’m listening to “Red Gold” right now.

  9. tabula rasa
    Flagg Taylor

    Illiniguy

    Flagg Taylor: How about an Alan Furst novel? · 0 minutes ago

    I’m listening to “Red Gold?right now. · 1 hour ago

    Haven’t read that one yet, but love the others.  The Polish Officeris my fav. · 8 hours ago

    Over the years, I read or listened to them all.  Furst really understands the atmosphere on Europe in run-up to WWII.  They translate beautifully to audio.

  10. tabula rasa

    Thanks so much for the great recommendations.  Some are already in my library:  for example, Patrick Tull reading the Master and Commander books.  I consider it the best audio series ever.  The books are great and Tull captures them perfectly.

    But there are a bunch of ones I’ve never heard of or that I was reluctant to buy (Katie points me to How Green Was My Valley, which I’ve been reluctant about because of the over-sugary movie).  And I’ve never heard of Bujold and Gillis.  Now I’ve got to narrow them down to two.  I’m tempted by Sayers–it’s been years.  She comes even more highly recommended because she was a close friend and correspondent with my hero, C. S. Lewis.  

    Keep ‘em coming.  If I don’t buy them, someone else will.  

  11. RushBabe49

    Dorothy L. Sayers, Peter Wimsey mystery novels narrated by Ian Carmichael (he played Wimsey in some of the Masterpiece Theater dramatizations).  I saw “Unnatural Death” and “Gaudy Night”.

  12. Jerry Broaddus

    Steinbeck’s “Cannery Row”.

    Just wonderful.

  13. katievs

    TR, my husband and I have both lately been swooning over the audio version of How Green Was my Valley.  It’s far, far superior to the too-sentimental movie.

  14. katievs

    Thanks to the unnatural chill of Memorial Day weekend in PA, I was able to endure about 40 minutes of sunbathing today.  (If you’re going to be Mother of the Bride in a matter of weeks, you have a duty not to be deadly pale.)  I did it by listening to Kim, thanks to Jay Nordlinger’s recent gushing recommendation on a Need to Know podcast.  He’s right about the poetry of its language.  I had read it years ago with admiration, but had forgotten it.

  15. Basil Fawlty
    Little My:  And I just finished listening for the third time to Patrick Tull’s reading of Master and Commander. I was acquainted with the late Patrick Tull when I was part of the Patrick O’Brian discussion group. He always had witty and erudite comments, and pointed out that as a professional reader, he had to always be practicing in order to keep his voice at peak performance. I believe he was an actor by profession. Unfortunately, Audible only has the first volume of the series as read by Patrick Tull, probably for copyright reasons. · 3 hours ago

    As you probably already know, most if not all of the O’Brian novels narrated by Patrick Tull are available from Audible in the US. 

  16. Snirtler

    Rob Long recently recommended Neil Gaiman’s American Gods. If it’s quirky fantasy, I prefer Terry Pratchett myself, but an America-themed book might be more appropriate for Memorial Day. 

    For a quirky mystery, how about Alexander McCall Smith’s #1 Ladies Detective Agency about the only lady detective in Botswana?

  17. Flagg Taylor
    Illiniguy

    Flagg Taylor: How about an Alan Furst novel? · 0 minutes ago

    I’m listening to “Red Gold?right now. · 1 hour ago

    Haven’t read that one yet, but love the others.  The Polish Officer is my fav.

  18. Colin B Lane

    It’s not a mystery novel, but it sure reads like one. Try People Who Eat Darkness. First learned of it when listening to an interview Dennis Prager did with the author, Richard Lloyd Parry. A cracking good read that provides insight into human nature as seen through the lens of Japanese culture and the Japanese criminal justice system.  I both read and listened to it.  The Audible reader was excellent.

  19. Richard Fulmer

    I’m listening to Thomas Sowell’s Basic Economics right now and I love it.

  20. Vald the Misspeller

     Barbara Tuchman’s The Guns of August – the comedy of errors that led up to WWI.

    Bone of Contention by Roberta Gellis -  A mystery set in 12th century England. The heroine is the madam of the Old Priory Guesthouse, an up scale whorehouse whose landlord is the Bishop of Winchester.

    Candy Bombers by Andrei Cherny – winning hearts and minds one sweet tooth at a time.

    The Curse of Chalion – Best know for her sci-fi series, the Vorkosigan Saga, Lois McMaster Bujold writes great fantasy as well.

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